From content marketing strategy to long-form articles – content marketing trends

You need a more inclusive content marketing strategy

There’s a decent chance you need to take a look at your content marketing strategy, Content marketing strategyand figure out how to get the rest of the company involved.

That’s according to Zazzle’s 2017 State of Content Marketing Survey.

The latest edition of this mighty tome of insight asked content marketers to score the extent to which they agreed with certain statements out of 100.

The average score when asked to rank “Our content marketing strategy is linked to all other parts of the business” was just 50. That’s basically criminal. Let me tell you why:

  • You won’t find out about new developments or initiatives, which makes a great source of inspiration
  • You aren’t exposed to customer feedback, so you don’t find out about the things they really love
  • You have to spend time digging out (or, even spinning) new blogs that lack depth
  • Your brand voice will become narrow and one-dimensional

So, what can you do to get the whole of your company on the content marketing bandwagon? Well, why not try:

  • Opening up a dialogue with the head honchos
  • Inviting your colleagues to pitch in with ideas (or, even some creative assistance)
  • Asking staff to share the content you’re producing
  • Telling your team’s story using your content

You might face a few raised eyebrows at first. But, getting your whole company on-side will improve your content marketing strategy and make your job a hell of a lot easier!

Long-form articles are much-loved by execs

The Quartz Global Executives Study has shone the spotlight on the reading habits of company execs. And, they’re truly in love with content marketing.

Among the starkest findings is their penchant for long-form content. A massive 84% say they’re most likely to share weightier pieces with their social networks.

This only serves to support the suspicions we’ve long had about B2B content. Long-form blogs and articles provide a level of detail and authority that’s far more attractive to businesspeople than more traditional ads.

In fact, branded articles are far more likely initiate engagement than any other form of advertising:

The study also tells us exactly what ingredients the higher-ups like to see in their content. 85% want some form of industry analysis, while 68% are more likely to interact with content that features data visualisations.

*Graphs courtesy of Quartz

Last, but by no means least, the study tells us when and how they want it delivered. Unlike other demographics, 94% are most likely to get their news via email, and 74% are most likely to read news in the morning.

So, there you have it. This is the recipe for hooking high-level staff with your content, and long-form is the key ingredient.

Spotted in the news…

The election results are in! No, not THOSE election results. The search results from the night the snap election was called. According to analysis from Hitwise:

  • Searches for ‘Theresa May’ spiked by 2,000% on print media sites
  • Three-fifths of all searches were about election news
  • Most searches were posed as questions (indicating public confusion)
  • “What is a snap election?” and “snap election meaning” both featured in the top six search results for this topic

Once again, Google tells us more than the main news sources when election time rolls around. And, this time, we’ve learned that people are just doing the digital equivalent of scratching their heads.