From content marketing for travel brands to Brexit – content marketing trends

Content marketing for travel brands is changing 

Mobile devices and customers’ lust for personalisation are completely transforming content marketing for travel brands. Content marketing for travel brands

According to Econsultancy’s new Digital Trends in the Travel and Hospitality report, around one third of all travel industry sales are made using mobile devices. 

This figure is growing 15% year-on-year, and has led to a 39% increase in the total number of unique visitors to all travel sites since 2014. 

So, optimise for mobile, right? Well, yes. But, in an industry as multi-faceted and dynamic as travel, it’s not quite so simple! 

Ultimately, it’s all about optimising the overall travel brand customer experience on mobile. 

Developers can take care of some of this; speeding up page-load times and reducing the number of steps between actions, yada yada yada. 

However, it’s your job to improve customer experience by ensuring users walk away feeling like the entire service has been individually tailored to them. 

Fortunately, when carrying out content marketing for travel brands, you’ll find there are plenty of opportunities to personalise your approach. 

Think about: 

  • Where users access the site on mobile devices: At home, in downtime at work, while travelling, at the destination, after their return etc. 
  • What they want to use the site for: Booking, research, information, instructions, directions, sourcing/providing recommendations etc. 
  • What tools/info will make their experience more enjoyable: Cost calculators, itineraries (region and theme-specific), travel guides, sightseeing checklists, testimonials etc. 

Develop a broad pool of original content around these themes, for all of your key customer demographics and locations. 

This should start to get potential customers on-side straight away. But, if you want to take this further, you can adopt a data strategy that ensures the right content (with the right focus) is promoted to the right customer type at the most relevant stage in their buyer cycle. 

Tug on those heartstrings to increase customer loyalty 

Just how important is emotion when it comes to building customer loyalty? 

Well, Capgemini recently published the results of an epic study into this exact topic. 

The organisation surveyed over 9,000 consumers, 500 executives and a host of leading business academics to get to grips with the potency of emotional engagement today. 

Let’s start with the most damning statistic. While 80% of execs think their brand understands the emotional needs of their customers, just 15% of customers agree. 

So, let’s see what all these execs are missing out on: 

  • Consumers with high emotional engagement purchase from brands they’re loyal to 82% of the time, compared to just 38% for those with low emotional engagement 
  • 81% of consumers with high emotional engagement promote brands they’re loyal to among friends and family, compared to 50% of people with low emotional engagement 
  • 62% of consumers with high emotional engagement will promote brands they’re loyal to on social media, as opposed to just 7% of those with low emotional engagement 
  • 70% of consumers with high emotional engagement will spend two to three times more on brands they’re loyal to, compared to 49% of those with low emotional engagement 

If all that hasn’t convinced you of the value of emotional engagement, nothing will! But, how do you generate emotional engagement? Use your content strategy to add a dash of humanity to your brand, and talk about things your customers care about using a voice like theirs. 

Spotted in the news… 

Having been close to stalling last week, Brexit is once again lumbering clumsily towards the closest thing we’ll see to an actual conclusion. 

The Irish border situation was the major stumbling block of last week. All parties were in favour of maintaining the status quo, yet this was downright impossible considering EU trade regulations. Ol’ Theresa had to call on a bit of wordplay to remove the blockage. ‘Regulatory alignment’ turned out to be the magic phrase. 

Essentially, these words proved broad enough to placate all parties long enough to move onto the next stage of negotiations. Remember this as a prime example of how the same language can be perceived in completely different ways by parties with different (or even completely contradictory) interests and motivations! 

Privacy Preference Center

Close your account?

Your account will be closed and all data will be permanently deleted and cannot be recovered. Are you sure?