Content, SEO and social media news: weekly round up

74% of SMEs use content marketing to boost SEO

A new survey from BusinessBolts.com has revealed that almost 3 out of 4 small businesses are using content marketing to promote their brand and enhance their SEO – and 45% of respondents said that using content marketing had enabled them to lower their advertising budgets. The most popular form of content was shown to be articles, but 53% of companies also claimed that they planned to create video content in 2013 too. According to BusinessBolts.com, “The number one question marketers want answered is how to use content marketing to gain the most SEO benefit. They want high rankings in the search engines for their content.”

‘Blogmany’ attracts 80 million users

A campaign funded by tourism agency VisitScotland has attracted an incredible amount of attention, thanks to its social media and blog contributions. Dubbed ‘Blogmanay’, the event was designed to draw attention to the country’s Hogmanay celebrations, and has generated more than 9,000 tweets, 70 blog posts and 1,300 Instagram pictures. Brian Ferguson of The Scotsman elaborated, “Pictures, tweets and blog generated over a two-week period, which saw the group take in Edinburgh’s Hogmany celebrations and then head off on tours of the Highlands is said to have now reached more than 80 million people around the world. Around four million people are said to have been posting or sharing material since the campaign got underway.”

New York’s Restaurants ban patrons from photographing their food

The New York Times has claimed that a number of eateries in the city have enforced camera bans to prevent customers from photographing their food and sharing the images on social media, claiming that it ruins the atmosphere of their restaurant (something for us to bear in mind during next month’s Digital Mission to New York!). David Bouley, who owns two establishments in New York, will only allow diners to take pictures of their meals in the kitchens, as table photography “totally disrupts the ambiance.” He explains, “It’s a disaster in terms of momentum, settling into the meal, the great conversation that develops. It’s hard to build a memorable evening when flashes are flying every six minutes”.