From generational marketing to negative content – content marketing trends

Double-down on generational marketing to optimise your sales record

Generational marketing is among the most potent methods now replacing the old one-size-fits all approach. generational marketing

Age is a key differentiator that – to some extent at least – determines how people interact with various forms of content and distribution methods (e.g. social media or blogs).

This is the topic of a handy new infographic from HMW, who has compiled a host of stats on generational marketing from a range of high-level sources.

Explore the full infographic (below) at your leisure. But, these were the most useful generational marketing conclusions we drew:

Baby boomers: 1946-1964

  • 34% use social media and Facebook is their preferred platform (36%)
  • 89% of people aged 60+ are interested in current affairs and 54% read about this in-depth
  • Preferred topics include: environment, local topics, politics, economy, health and education
  • Primarily consume a broad range of digital content
  • Most active online between 5am and noon
  • Appeal to them using high-quality blogs, emails, Facebook posts and discount offers

Generation X: 1965-1980

  • 64% use social media; Facebook is their preferred platform (61%), but they also like Twitter (18%)
  • 77% of people aged 40-59 are interested in current affairs and 43% read about this in-depth
  • Preferred topics include: environment, local topics, politics, business, health and education
  • Primarily consume entertainment/lifestyle-related content
  • Most active online between 8pm and midnight
  • Appeal to them using blogs, email, Twitter posts and video

Generation Y (Millennials): 1981-1999

  • 80% use social media; Facebook is favourite platform (79%), but Twitter is also popular (22%)
  • 75% of people aged 30-39 are interested in current affairs and 33% read about this in-depth
  • Preferred topics include: environment, local topics, politics, business, foreign news and science/tech
  • Primarily consume brief, online content
  • Most active online between 4pm and midnight
  • Appeal to them using social media, user generated content, mobile/SMS marketing

Generation Z: 2000+

  • 86% use social media; they’re big on Facebook (88%), but also use Twitter (36%) and Instagram (59%)
  • 59% of people aged 18-29 are interested in current affairs and 25% read about this in-depth
  • Preferred topics include: the environment, business, health and social issues
  • Primarily consume video
  • Most active online between 4pm and midnight
  • Appeal to them using social media (all platforms), memes, images, interactive content

With this in mind, adapt your content strategy so it takes account of these factors to master generational marketing and optimise your sales record.

Less than 10% of ecommerce site visitors intend to purchase

92% of ecommerce site visitors have no intention of making a purchase, according to Episerver’s new ‘Reimagining Commerce’ report

The report – which surveyed over 1,000 ecommerce site users – identified ‘searching for a product or service’ as the most common reason for visiting (45%), followed by ‘comparing prices or other website variables between brands’ (26%).

Despite this, most ecommerce companies still gear their sites (in terms of both content and design) towards capturing purchases on the first visit.

So, what should content marketers do to bring their approach into line with consumer intentions?

Enhancing the customer experience while accommodating these tendencies undoubtedly involves some design elements. You should optimise all areas of your website – not just your product listing and checkout pages – to provide a fluid, coherent navigation on both mobile and desktop devices.

But, so much of this boils to the content you create and how you position this. The report highlighted how:

  • 98% of shoppers have decided against purchasing based on incomplete/incorrect content
  • 59% want personalisation online, but just 7% believe brands do this well
  • 28% cite personalised content among their top three contributors to a positive online experience
  • 21% of shoppers are more likely to make repeat purchases from a brand that personalises their experience

So, to give consumers the content they’re clearly craving, start by developing your customer personas. You should aim to generate a holistic understanding of all relevant customer types. This includes their lifestyle, the problems they’re trying to solve and why they should choose you as a potential solution.

Then, use this insight to start generating content. Publish blogs, guides and white papers demonstrating your understanding of their pain points, as well as case studies and testimonials from satisfied clients. Then, create detailed product listings, instructions and tips to help them feel they’ll be getting maximum value.

This report represents a fantastic opportunity for content marketers. So, ditch the overtly sales-orientated approach and become a trusted partner for your visitors to help tempt them all the way through that sales funnel.

Spotted in the news…

When you’re a major brand, negative content happens. But, last week, Trump treated us to a masterclass in how NOT to respond.

Following Michael Wolff’s publication of the salacious allegations included in ‘Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House’, the ‘so-called’ POTUS decided to issue his rebuttal on Twitter in the most bombastic and unhinged terms.

In a flurry of tweets on Saturday, Trump described himself as both a “very stable genius and “like, really smart”. Broken rule #1: handle negative content with a sense of ease and brevity à la Hillary Clinton – don’t appear rattled. Broken rule #2: when boasting about your intelligence, make sure to use the proper grammatical form, not, like, adolescent-sounding slang.