From word-of-mouth marketing to Google’s next CEO: content marketing trends

Word-of-mouth marketingContent is crucial for word-of-mouth marketing

Word-of-mouth marketing (WOMM) – personally recommending a brand, product or service to a friend or family member – makes consumers 90% more likely to buy from a company, according to new research from Invesp.

WOMM doesn’t just happen, though. Original, compelling, entertaining and authoritative content is key to getting consumers talking to each other about your brand. This is because storytelling helps you make a strong emotional connection with your readers. If you succeed, your brand is three times more likely to be discussed by your readers’ friends and families.

When consumers sharing your actual content, as opposed to paraphrasing it, their friends receive your message in its entirety. Always do what you can to encourage social media sharing of your pieces.

If word-of-mouth marketing is your desired end (and, it should be), content marketing is the means that’ll get you there.

Relevance is biggest barrier to email marketing success

“Email is dead”. “Email is resurrected”. There’s clearly a penchant for content marketers to make sweeping statements about email marketing.

But, with 95% of marketers now agreeing that email is “important” or “very important” to their promotional activities (so says DMA’s ‘Email Tracking Study 2017‘), it seems there’s a consensus  – for now at least.

There’s just one small chink in this argument. A devastatingly pitiful 9% of respondents think all their marketing emails are actually relevant to customers, with 38% conceding just ‘some’ are relevant at best.

Email marketing effectiveness graph

An irrelevant email won’t just have a neutral effect. Constant exposure to undesirable marketing communications will eventually turn customers off from your brand altogether. So, it’s time to double down on relevance.

Spotted in the news…

Letters from childrenGoogle CEO Sundar Pichai melted hearts all over the world when he replied to a 7-year-old girl’s adorable job application.

Chloe Bridgewater from Hereford wrote to Pichai to tell him of her love for technology (as well as robots, swimming and chocolate). She informed him of her intention to work for Google one day.

Like a pro, Pichai wrote back: “If you keep working hard and following your dreams, you can accomplish everything you set your mind to.”

More from: Content Strategy / Weekly Round-Up